Coffee debate update

So the coffee debate continues. Today’s headline in The Telegraph shouts an enthusiastic message that drinking coffee could reverse the signs of Alzhiemer’s disease. The trial led by Dr Gary Arendash, an American neuroscientist presents evidence that indicates that caffeine not only helps to stave off the disease, but can actually treat it. The defining hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease is the accumulation of β-amyloid protein plaques in the the areas of the brain responsible for memory (the cortex and hippocampus). These ‘sticky’ deposits are known to damage nerve cells, interfere with nerve signalling and therefore memory. Caffeine, it appears, actually reduces the production of β-amyloid protein and therefore would reduce the production of plaques. So that’s the good news folks. The bad news is that this groundbreaking research was conducted using mice. Not bad news as such if you’re a coffee drinking mouse who can’t remember where you’ve left your cheese. These findings do however support an earlier study published in January this year. Led by Marjo H. Eskelinen the study found that among 1,400 Finnish adults followed for 20 years, those who drank three to five cups of coffee per day in middle-age were two-thirds less likely than non-drinkers to develop dementia, including Alzheimer’s disease. So for the time being I shall continue to enjoy my morning cafetière, not only because I enjoy the ritual and the taste but because it may, just may help me retain my memory in years to come.

Coffee Controversy: is it good or is it bad for you?

I seem to have witnessed recently several identical conversations regarding coffee drinking. Is it good or bad for you? It’s not the coffee debate per say that intrigues me but this need for something to be so black or white, good or bad. I think it depends in part on where or from whom we get our information and the message that source wants to portray. It is true that coffee has well-documented side effects including anxiety, insomnia, tremor and palpitations. But on the plus side drinking coffee appears to improve alertness and some reports suggest that drinking 3 cups a day may even, reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes, protect against cancer and offer protections against dementia including reducing the risk of developing Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease. So we have the good and the bad.

Coffee, however, like the majority of food stuffs we consume, is a complex composition. The side effects often associated with a steaming cup of java are actually the result of caffeine, which belongs to a group of stimulants called xanthenes. In moderation, caffeine can have very positive effects. It gives us more energy, heightens our ability to concentrate and makes us think more clearly and can even elevate our mood. That doesn’t sound so bad. But as with most things it merely boils down to moderation. If we drink caffeinated coffee in moderation it can increase alertness and mental stamina. If we drink too much too quickly, however, we are faced with the unpleasant side effects: nausea, confusion and excitability, which can be wholly unpleasant.

As with most things in life it’s not as simple as black or white. We need to look at the diet as a whole. Most foods we eat will have positive and negative factors, of which we are constantly being reminded by the tabloid headlines. Often telling just one side of the story, these messages can be somewhat confusing and frequently leave people rather bewildered as to what to consume and what to avoid. It’s a case of being sensible, taking everything in moderation and listening to the messages your body tells you. If you get the shakes after your morning espresso then that’s your body saying stop now, that’s enough.