Peripheral Neuropathy in Diabetics; what steps can we take to avoid it?

You might already be aware that of the many deteriorative conditions related to diabetes; ‘peripheral neuropathy’ is perhaps the most common, with an estimated 60-70% of diabetics reportedly experiencing symptoms. ‘Neuropathy’ describes damage, whether moderate or severe, to the peripheral nervous system (the ‘external’ portion of the nervous system, situated beyond the brain and spinal cord), which transmits information directly from the brain and spinal cord to the rest of the body.

Our nervous system acts very similarly to an electrical cable; with the nerve’s ‘impulse’ adopting the role of the electrical wire itself, and the ‘myelin sheath’ (the ‘skin’ of the nerve), mimicking the insulation surrounding the wire. If the wire becomes damaged, then the nerve signal will not travel efficiently along the wire, nor will it transmit the intended messages as instantaneously. This delay results inevitably in the ‘classic’ symptoms of neuropathy; namely; tingling, numbness, ‘burning’ and pain.

A causative link has been drawn between neuropathy and deficiencies of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids within the body. Indeed, insulin itself plays a pivotal role in the metabolism of EFAs (essential fatty acids), by alerting the genes necessary for enzyme-conversion to begin the process of converting short-chain fatty acids into a bio-available (i.e. usable by the body) long-chain fatty acid.

Where insulin is absent, or enzyme-activity impeded, the enzymes needed to create specific fatty acids cannot be produced and a deficiency results. Of the myelin layer which protects our vulnerable nerves, an estimated 75 % is composed exclusively of EFA’s (these are termed ‘essential’ because the body cannot generate them independently, but must instead source them externally from the diet). Depletion of this fatty, insulatory layer, leads to severe nerve damage (Neuropathy).

Nutrition, as all Diabetics are painfully aware, is central to the manufacture of insulin and for creating the right ‘biological environment’ to encourage enzyme conversions to take place. By boosting or supplementing our dietary levels of long-chain fatty acids we can essentially sidestep the risk that the enzyme-mediated conversions will fail to progress past the initial hurdle.

Fatty acid supplementation nourishes the myelin sheath, and prevents further degeneration of inter-cellular communication; it reduces the risk of developing Neuropathy, and actually reinvigorates nerve endings to overcome numbness and the likelihood of eventual tissue loss. However, EPA, a specific omega-3 fatty acid found in fish oil that appears to have significant beneficial effects on diabetic neuropathy and serum lipids as well as other diabetic complications such as nephropathy (kidney damage) and macroangiopathy (damage to the blood vessels). EPA plays a role in the compaction, stabilization, and maintenance of myelin sheaths by regulating the production of proteolipid protein or PLP. PLP is literally the ‘glue’ that hold in place the sheets of protective fats that cover the nerve axon. Loss of PLP is associated with many conditions that have nerve damage including Multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer’s disease and Huntington chorea.

OmegaForce is a patented formulation of omega-3 and 6 long-chain fatty acids with a multitude of health-enhancing properties, including anti-inflammatory and pain-relieving actions. For more information on the relationship between EPA deficiency and the pathogenesis of Diabetic Neuropathy, please go to www.igennus.com

Omega-3 fish oil supplements reduce cardiovascular disease in diabetics

According to a new study from Tehran University of Medical Sciences in Iran, daily intake of omega-3 fatty acids may reduce levels of a trigger substance linked to heart disease in diabetics.

Results published in the peer-reviewed journal Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Disease suggest that high doses of omega-3 fish oil daily (3 grams per day) cut levels of the amino acid homocysteine by 22%, compared with less than 1% in the placebo group.

81 diabetics took part in this randomised, double-blind placebo-controlled trial, which lasted two months with participants randomly assigned to either receive 3 grams of omega-3 or a sunflower oil placebo daily.

Previous research has linked increased levels of homocysteine with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. By lowering levels of this amino acid in the blood, scientists believe it is possible to reduce their heart disease risk, providing support for the inclusion of omega-3s as part of the diabetic diet. Evidence is not yet conclusive however, and further research needs to be conducted before firm conclusions may be drawn.

The number of diabetics diagnosed with the disease soared by 70,000 in the UK between 2006-7, according to a report by the Information Centre for Health and Social Care.
According to their report, people affected by diabetes in the UK has climbed to 3.7 per cent, with a record number of 1,986,200 people diagnosed with the condition; a further 750,000 people are likely to have diabetes and not be aware of it. These figures paint a worrying picture for the health of the nation.

The Chief Executive of Diabetes UK, Douglas Smallwood, commented: “These figures are truly alarming as diabetes is a serious condition, which can lead to blindness, kidney failure, heart disease, stroke and nerve damage that can cause amputation . We need to do all we can to raise awareness of the condition and to encourage people to follow a healthy diet, and pursue an active lifestyle to help them reduce their risk of developing diabetes.”

When you consider that the impact of our 24/7 culture is that we tend to drive to work, drink a little too much, eat too few freshly prepared meals (not to mention that most of us are probably short on dietary fibre) you can appreciate why diabetes is becoming a real problem.

This is not to say that there’s nothing we can do about it, however. Simple changes to our diet and lifestyle and dramatically decrease our chance of developing diabetes and, if you’re affected already, it is definitely possible to influence the likelihood of associated health problems as the condition advances. As a nutrition scientist I would advise a diet with increased fibre, whole grains, few sugars, as well as cutting out the bad fats – this is actually a good approach for anyone.

I’d also add to the diet highly concentrated omega-3 fish oil containing pure EPA, an active component of fish oil which is especially beneficial for reducing the risk of complications in the cardiovascular system. OmegaForce is ideal in this respect, as it combines with pure EPA the omega-6 GLA (highly anti-inflammatory) with the omega-9 oleic acid from olive oil, its benefits associated with the healthy Mediterranean diet.

For more information about omega-3 fatty acids and how they can be included as part of the diet, click here.

A diet rich in fish oils could extend your life, research shows

Researchers from Norway and France found that elderly people who consume plenty of omega-3 acids, found in oily fish such as salmon, not only performed better in cognitive function tests than those who do not, but also demonstrated greater longevity than those who don’t regularly consume fish.

Norwegian researchers studied 254 frail, elderly patients and measured their dietary intakes of omega-3 fatty acids using plasma phospholipid concentrations of EPA. Patients’ omega-3 consumption was analysed and they were asked to return for further analysis after a period of three years. The results later showed that those tested with the lowest plasma phospholipid EPA levels were approximately 40 per cent more likely to die.

The French researchers observed 1214 healthy participants over a period of four years, 65 of which developed dementia. The results showed that only those with higher blood levels of EPA were linked with the reduced risk (31 per cent) of contracting dementia.

The omega-3 fatty acid EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid), which occurs naturally in oily fish such as salmon, mackerel and tuna, is responsible for a range of health benefits, from combating heart disease to boosting intelligence.
Despite this, most people eat just a fifth of the amount recommended for good health. The fact of the matter is that most people do not consume enough oily fish to reap the benefits of fatty acids, so supplementation with fish oils is a more viable option for many.
Vegepa is a patented formulation of completely natural long-chain omega fatty acids. It contains a unique ratio of ultra-pure EPA (the omega-3 eicosapentaenoic acid) and cold-pressed, non-raffinated, virgin evening primrose oil (containing the omega-6 gamma-linolenic acid). As such, Vegepa combines the benefits that both these natural substances bring to the body.

Fatty acids play an important part in the functioning of every living cell in the body. Specifically they may help the body in several ways including: improving the circulatory system, aiding concentration, maintaining a well-balanced state of mind and keeping joints in good condition.

The EPA in Vegepa is derived from fish oil – the highest yielding source of long-chain omega-3 fats. This fatty acid forms a vital part of the diet as it enables the body to produce many substances that are necessary for health and well-being.

The evening primrose oil (EPO) in Vegepa is derived from the cold pressing of evening primrose seeds. When EPO is unprocessed and unrefined it is a rich source of botanical triterpenes hormone-like substances, which play an important role in immune function. Just two capsules daily provide 560 mg EPA and 200 mg organic EPO, and help to reverse fatty acid deficiencies by nourishing the brain’s phospholipids. Vegepa is available from all good health food shops, or online at www.igennus.com

The Alzheimer’s Society provides a national help line on 0845 3000 336 and website www.alzheimers.org.uk.

Omega-3 boosts sight

According to the data pooled from nine previously conducted studies, published in the June issue of Archives of Opthalmology, [i] the most marked benefits relate to more advanced AMD, although increasing one’s intake of omega-3 is associated with a lower risk of both early and late onset of AMD.

AMD is the prime cause of blindness over the age of 55 in the West, according to AMD Alliance International. Its incidence is not insignificant, with 25-30 million people affected worldwide. Scientists are predicting these figures to increase as the unhealthy generation of baby boomers gets older.

AMD is a degenerative disease of the retina, causing loss of central vision which leaves sufferers with only peripheral vision. Early detection is crucial as it can enable effective treatment to be prescribed before the condition worsens.

This recent study is welcome news because it suggests that we can and should take a proactive approach to our health. Long-chain omega-3 fatty acids form building blocks in the layer of nerve cells in the retina, therefore playing an important part in maintaining healthy eyesight. According to the lead author of the study, “a diet rich in omega-3 fatty acids and fish, as a proxy for long-chain omega-3 fatty acid intake, has therefore been hypothesised as a means to prevent AMD”.

Additionally, the outer photoreceptor (cell segments of the outer retina) are constantly shred in the normal visual cycle and deficiencies of omega-3 fatty acids may initiate AMD. The researchers have also highlighted the protective effect of long-chain omega-3 fatty acids against oxygenic, inflammatory and age-associated pathology of the vascular and neural retina, all of which are thought to affect the onset of AMD. All the more reason, we believe, to ensure that your diet is rich in the important bioavailable fatty acids.

[i]: Chong, E.W.-T., Kreis, A.J., Wong, T.Y. ,. Simpson, J.A, Guymer, R.H. “Dietary -3 Fatty Acid and Fish Intake in the Primary Prevention of Age-Related Macular Degeneration – A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis” Archives of Ophthalmology, Vol.126:6 pp. 826-833

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